Menu
RSS
Top 6 Black-To-School Scholarship Programs For African American Students In Fall/Winter 2017

Top 6 Black-To-School Scholarship P…

Nationwide (BlackNews.com...

Time for Change Foundation Hosts Grand Opening

Time for Change Foundation Hosts Gr…

San Bernardino, CA - Sept...

We Must Have A New Poor People’s Campaign and Moral Revival

We Must Have A New Poor People’s Ca…

Channeling the incisive a...

Peaceful Demonstration at Rancho Motors, Victorville, CA

Peaceful Demonstration at Rancho Mo…

Several concerned communi...

Civil Rights Groups Urge Black Parents to Lead on ESSA State Plans

Civil Rights Groups Urge Black Pare…

Sirraya Gant, the mother ...

Black UFC Fighter Rescues Man with Confederate Flag from Harvey Floodwaters

Black UFC Fighter Rescues Man with …

“He wanted to take the fl...

White Supremacy:  America’s Original  Sin

White Supremacy: America’s Origina…

Publishers Corner Clifto...

It’s Time for Congress to Pass a Hurricane Harvey Emergency Funding Package

It’s Time for Congress to Pass a Hu…

Historically, during time...

The Los Angeles Grand Jury Has Been Requested to Investigate California Governor Jerry Brown for Corruption

The Los Angeles Grand Jury Has Been…

Nationwide — Billy Earley...

Prev Next



L.A. County Fair Sept 1-24, 2017

A+ A A-

Failure to Find a Job Can Land Women Back in Prison

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (www.ucr.edu) — Los Angeles incarcerates more people than any other city in the world, at a fiscal cost of more than $75,000 per person annually. But University of California, Riverside sociologist Susila Gurusami said incarceration also has high social costs that disproportionately burden black communities in areas like South Los Angeles.

“Considering population numbers, black women are overrepresented in the American prison system,” said Gurusami, a UC Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow who spent 18 months at a South LA reentry home for formerly incarcerated, primarily black women. Nationally, black women are imprisoned at nearly double the rate of white women.

Gurusami’s findings, published in the journal Gender & Society, highlight the challenges confronted by black women after they leave prison, which include navigating post-release employment requirements.

Women who fail to secure post-release employment face violating the terms of their parole, which can lead to reincarceration. About 9,000 people are incarcerated every day in the United States for violating parole or probation employment mandates; 70 percent of them are black.

“The women I met were released with a lot of hope about the possibilities of their lives,” Gurusami said. “A lot of them were trying to earn degrees while working or looking for jobs, plus attending mandatory support groups for things like anger management and life skills that often ended up getting in the way of them getting hired.”

Other common challenges Gurusami witnessed involved balancing child care arrangements and custody requirements with work schedules, managing physical and mental health issues, and navigating LA's vast landscape using only public transportation.

The cumulative effect of these women’s experiences is best described by a concept Gurusami calls “intersectional capitalism.” The concept refers to the way different forces — capitalism, patriarchy and systemic racism — converge to produce groups of people who are more vulnerable than others, thus creating and perpetuating social and economic inequalities.

According to Gurusami, black women historically have grappled with a long tradition of hurdles, from enslavement to the Ronald Reagan-era stereotype of the “welfare queen,” which Gurusami said have sought to devalue them as human beings through their relationship to the labor market.

Overall, most of the women she encountered searched for full-time employment with little success. Yet one way many of them moved forward and built new skills was by becoming embedded in activism for currently and formerly incarcerated people.

“Mentoring other women and people who had come out of the incarceration system, going door to door to campaign for politicians, and learning how to advocate for themselves became powerful ways for these women to combat what typically becomes a cycle of reincarceration,” she said. “Still, to release someone from the prison system with few resources and high expectations of meeting rigid requirements is not the way to build a more functional society.”

To view the full release go to: https://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/48835

Read more...

Cycling for Social Equality

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (www.ucr.edu) – It’s a 3,500-mile trip. It’ll take him about 55 days, as he’ll average about 60 miles per day – with rest days in between. But, the University of California, Riverside student doesn’t mind, because it’s all for a good reason. Christian Lugo will cycle from Los Angeles, California, to Washington D.C. – the nation’s capital – this summer to help promote social equality, diversity, and tolerance.

“I just thought to myself, there’s been so much hate the last few years, and you can’t expect people to just flip a switch and end hate, but at least I can do something to get some positive change going,” Lugo said.

Lugo is a second-year student, majoring in Spanish with a concentration in cultural studies. He was inspired to cycle across the country by a few recent experiences. He started cycling in March 2016, and said he immediately took to the sport. Not only did he start cycling as a form of exercise, but he started using it as his mode of transportation—to the grocery store, to school, even as a means of travel and experiencing new things.

In summer 2016, Lugo studied abroad in the Dominican Republic. Inspired by the professors and the people he met there, as well as the 2016 U.S. presidential election, he decided he would give cycle touring a shot. Though Lugo said his trip is not political in nature, he hopes to promote a positive message of cooperation and respect among all people.

“I will ride across the country encouraging people to sign a pledge for social equality, based on five principles,” he said.

For the full news release, please visit: https://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/47654

Read more...

Cool Center kickoff planned for June 2 in Banning

Who: Riverside University Health System-Public Health through County of Riverside Community Action Partnership.

What: Kickoff of Cool Center season in Riverside County.

Where: Banning Municipal Pool (749 N. San Gorgonio Ave., Banning, 92220)

When: June 2, 2017 starting at 9 a.m.

Why: Summer is almost here and temperatures are going to start rising throughout Riverside County. The Cool Center Program provides residents with a place to get out of the heat and cool off. There are about 50 locations throughout Riverside County, stretching from Temecula to Corona, and Hemet to the Coachella Valley, even as far away as Blythe. There is no better way to start the summer than with a free swim and some tasty food.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed