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Publication of Your Privacy in 2017

Publication of Your Privacy in 2017

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Study Finds Exposure to Racism Harms Children's Health

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Study Finds Exposure to Racism Harms Children's Health

New research to be presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting illustrates the unhealthy effects racism can have on children, with reported exposure to discrimination tied to higher rates of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), anxiety and depression, as well as decreased general health.

Authors of the study abstract, “The Detrimental Influence of Racial Discrimination in the United States,” will present their findings on Sunday, May 7, in the Moscone West Convention Center in San Francisco. For the study, they looked at data from 95,677 participants in the 2011-2012 National Survey on Children’s Health. In addition to providing physical and mental health records, caregivers of children in the survey were asked whether the child had experienced being “judged or treated unfairly” because of his or her race or ethnicity.

After adjusting for socioeconomic status, family structure, primary language and other factors, researchers found a significant link between exposure to racism and health. The average proportion of children reported by parents to be in “excellent health” decreased by 5.4 percent among those exposed to perceived discrimination, for example. Exposure to racism also appeared to boost the odds of ADHD by 3.2 percent.

The biggest reduction in general health appeared among low-income, minority children, particularly Hispanic participants, said Ashaunta Anderson, MD, MPH, lead author of the study and an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine.

Children exposed to discrimination who were from high-income households, however, also experienced negative health effects.

“White children with high income who experienced racial or ethnic discrimination had larger decreases in general health,” Anderson said, “while black children experiencing that combination of factors had increased rates of ADHD.”

The study also found that children who experienced racial discrimination had twice the odds of anxiety and depression compared to children who did not experience discrimination. In turn, children with anxiety or depression had roughly half the odds of excellent general health, and four times the odds of ADHD.

“Our findings suggest that racial discrimination contributes to race-based disparities in child health, independent of socioeconomic factors,” Anderson said, adding that coordinated efforts are needed to support children affected by discrimination with developmentally appropriate coping strategies and systems of care. In particular, she said, programs that provide positive parenting practices training and promote positive peer and role model relationships can help buffer children from the negative health effects of discrimination.

Anderson will present the abstract, “The Detrimental Influence of Racial Discrimination in the United States,” from 12:35 to 12:50 p.m. in conference rooms 2005-07.

The Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Meeting brings together thousands of individuals united to improve child health and wellbeing worldwide. For more information, visit the PAS Meeting online at www.pas-meeting.org.

For more information, please visit: https://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/46713

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Products Claiming to “Cure” Cancer Are a Cruel Deception

Many ads on social media and so-called “healthy” websites sell products and treatments that claim to cure cancer. They cannot.

Without clearance or approval for safety from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, these products can also contain dangerous ingredients and harm your health. That's true for products and treatments intended for humans and for pets.

Learn more about these potentially harmful products and treatments, and actions the FDA is taking to compel companies to remove fraudulent claims from their websites.

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Grant Is Among First to Address Mental Health Needs of Pacific Islanders

Although Pacific Islanders – persons who trace their roots to the native peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands – make up the third fastest growing racial group in the U.S., their mental health needs and attitudes regarding mental illness are poorly understood.

Andrew Subica, an assistant professor of social medicine and population health in the School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside, has received a two-year $452,000 grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to conduct one of the first studies of mental health and mental illness among Pacific Islanders.

“The goal of the study is to capture the perspectives of community-dwelling Pacific Islanders in two large Pacific Islander communities in order to develop the first culturally attuned manualized intervention to promote Pacific Islander engagement in mental health services,” Subica says. “Pacific Islanders constitute an invisible, understudied racial group suffering large mental and physical health disparities. Unfortunately, we know less about their mental health needs or how to treat them than perhaps any other U.S. racial group.”

For more information, please visit: https://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/46504

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